Mission

Today, much of the American West consists of Indian lands and public lands. If you walk backward through time in North America, you see a land that was mostly public land and Indian land--ultimately, as we know, it was once ALL Indian Country. The issue of the management of these precious lands continues to be a hot topic for policymakers, citizens, and government officials at all four levels of government: local, state, federal, and tribal. The issue of public lands and Indian lands management is as old as the story of America itself, the story since first contact with Europeans in the 15th and 16th Centuries. 

The Indian Lands and Public Lands Alliance is a new organization meeting a historic challenge, staffed and chaired by a seasoned team with over 25 years of experience in public policy and over 50 years of experience in Indian affairs and Indian scholarship. Founded with the blessing and input from the renowned Western Indian scholar Dr. Floyd A. O'Neil, the ILPLA seeks to establish a new standard for policy input in these critical times for land use, energy policy, and most critical of all: the complimentary issues of Indian lands sovereignty and public lands trust. 

 

 

 

 

Goals

The goal of the ILPLA is to create an alliance between those who wish to defend Indian sovereignty while  supporting the integrity of federally protected public lands. Indian lands and public lands are the two leading targets of oligarchical privatization forces who seek to dismantle the modern sovereign nation-state as much as they intend to continue the "slow" genocide of indigenous peoples. 

01.

Defend Indian Sovereignty

02.

Protect Public Lands

03.

Modern New Deal

04.

Paradigm Shift

 
 Dr. Floyd A. O'Neil, Board Member Emeritus of the Indian Lands and Public Lands Alliance. Dr. O'Neil has spent nearly all of his life researching American Indian history, helping tribes defend their sovereign status. 

Dr. Floyd A. O'Neil, Board Member Emeritus of the Indian Lands and Public Lands Alliance. Dr. O'Neil has spent nearly all of his life researching American Indian history, helping tribes defend their sovereign status.